Midcentury design spotlighted in new doc series on evolving American style 

An archival image of the <a class="ql-link" href="https://ny.curbed.com/2015/6/30/9944758/explore-the-twa-terminal-a-pristine-time-capsule-from-1962" target="_blank">TWA Flight Center</a> in New York City.

The four-part series premieres on CNN this Sunday

From timeless furniture to stylishly efficient homes, there’s
a lot to love about midcentury modern
architecture and design. (And if you’ve ever peeked into
Curbed’s Facebook group for all things
midcentury
, you’d know that the love is constantly
overflowing.)

Iconic midcentury design didn’t just materialize out of thin
air, however, and a new documentary mini-series premiering this
weekend will explore just what kind of larger-scale influences
helped shape a monumental era of design. American
Style
, produced by Vox Entertainment* for CNN,
will survey how the country’s style through the decades—from
fashion to architecture—has been informed by political, social,
and economic climates of the time.


Brian Thomas Jones Bob Hope’s
John Lautner-designed home
in Palm Springs.

Brian Thomas Jones

An episode that may be of particular interest to Curbed readers
is part two of the four-part series, airing 10 p.m. ET on Sunday,
January 13. Focusing on the style trends of the ’60s and ’70s,
the episode features glorious archival footage and interviews with
design luminaries like Tommy Hilfiger and Frank Gehry, who lauded
the work of legendary midcentury architect John Lautner.

Lautner’s organic-meets-otherworldly houses, and, of course,
Eero Saarinen’s
TWA Flight Center
in New York City, are prime examples of
masterpieces completed against the backdrop of the Space Race, the
“Golden Age” of flying, and an outsize imagination about the
future.

American
Style
premieres this Sunday, January 13, at 9 pm ET on CNN.

* Vox Entertainment is Curbed parent company Vox Media’s Los
Angeles-based studio that develops, sells, and produces premium,
non-fiction programming for TV and streaming media platforms.

Source: FS – All – Architecture 10
Midcentury design spotlighted in new doc series on evolving American style